THE PROJECT

Achieving a greater scientific understanding of our urban areas, one plant specimen at a time.

 

In light of the increasingly urban future of our planet, a thorough understanding of the biological processes at work in urban areas is necessary for the continued survival of Earth's inhabitants, including humans. The first step in that understanding is to know what thrives, survives, or perishes in cities, now and in the past. The Mid-Atlantic Megalopolis (MAM) Project begins this study by looking at vascular plants, with the digitization of nearly one million herbarium specimens from thirteen institutions in the urban corridor from New York City to Washington, D.C. As the largest, oldest, and most populated urban corridor in the U.S., this area and its flora present a unique opportunity for the study of urbanization, particularly given its rich herbarium collections, containing specimens collected over the last 400 years. The data mobilized in this effort will help us achieve a better scientific understanding of living urban systems, a critical need for urban planners, restoration ecologists, environmental engineers, (landscape) architects, and conservationists engaged in creating more sustainable and better designed cities, including the constructed and restored natural environments of our urban areas.

Artwork © 2016 Riley Design & Illustration

This project is made possible by National Science Foundation Awards 1601697, 1600981, 1601393, 1601429, 1600976, 1601101, 1601503, 1743744, 1702441, 1801022.